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Day 6: A night in Ames


I am so close but I had to stop in Ames for the night because of the pain my on left foot. The walk here was beautiful though. I am walking slowly so I have time to enjoy the little things along the Camino. Can't wait to get home so I can post all the pictures (and correct all the typos).

Today, I walked through A Esclavitude, A Picaraña, Faramello and Milladouro. Each little town is a bit different but it's all very green, full of flowers and postcard worthy. I saw people working on their land, hanging out, taking a walk and walking their dogs. Watching Gallegos having a conversation is like watching a telenovela - it's so animated... They're voices raise up, go back down and they get all excited. As you walk by they all say hi and continue talking as if they never interrupted the flow of the conversation by saying hi.

The weather is much colder today and I had my rain jacket on from the time I left Padron. I walked long stretches coming in and out of the woods. Not as much concrete as yesterday and not as much climbing either. As a side note, whoever said the Camino Portuguese is flat must've not done it. There's a lot of hiking and consequently a lot of downhill...not for the faint of heart. Anyways, when I got to Milladoiro, I knew I had to stop. It's just too much pain. The foot hurts so much. Also, I guess I'm compensating somehow because there's a ligament on the knee that's killing me as well. But I walked to Ames anyways instead of staying in Milladoiro. It's much closer to Santiago and I am staying at this lovely casa rural (more about it later).

After arriving in Ames, I walked to the pharmacy which is about 400ft away from the casa rural. I figured flip flops would be okay but boy was I wrong because it intensified the pain. So I hobbled all the way uphill. To make things more interesting, it started hailing. Crazy weather on the Portuguese Camino. One day I am hot, hot, hot and the other I am cold, cold, cold. Anyways, I am enjoying very much walking alone again with only my thoughts to keep me busy. It's peaceful and freeing. Time flies when you manage to overlook the pain and enjoy your surroundings. I'll get to Santiago soon enough.







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